All posts in Uncategorized

The Real Artisan Economy

Follow me
Head of Consulting at Conjunctured
Drew Jones, Ph.D is an organizational consultant, educator, and writer. He is a Lecturer of Management, Organizational Behavior, and Corporate Social Responsibility in the McCoy College of Business Administration at Texas State University, in San Marcos, TX. He has consulted with firms in the software, food and beverage, construction, advertising, sports management, coworking, and for profit education industries. He has published two books (The Innovation Acid Test: Growth Through Design and Differentiation, Triarchy Press 2008), including the first book about the coworking movement (I’m Outta: How coworking is making the office obsolete, with Todd Sundsted and Tony Bacigalupo, NotanMBA Press 2009), and has a third book (The Fifth Age of Work: Redesigning Work for a MobileSocial World, Night Owls Press), coming out Fall 2013. He has been involved in coworking since 2007, as a coworking space owner, partner, academic researcher, and consultant. He is a partner at Conjunctured Coworking.
Drew Jones
Follow me
Latest posts by Drew Jones (see all)

By Drew Jones Earlier today we visited several working studios in Arroyo Seco, NM, in between the town of Taos and Taos Ski Valley. Within this smallest of hamlets, there are numerous working potters, weavers, and craft brewers who are making a living working directly with their hands. Over the past several years I have written about what […]

Source: DJ Daily Drip

Far Beyond the Cubicle

Follow me
Head of Consulting at Conjunctured
Drew Jones, Ph.D is an organizational consultant, educator, and writer. He is a Lecturer of Management, Organizational Behavior, and Corporate Social Responsibility in the McCoy College of Business Administration at Texas State University, in San Marcos, TX. He has consulted with firms in the software, food and beverage, construction, advertising, sports management, coworking, and for profit education industries. He has published two books (The Innovation Acid Test: Growth Through Design and Differentiation, Triarchy Press 2008), including the first book about the coworking movement (I’m Outta: How coworking is making the office obsolete, with Todd Sundsted and Tony Bacigalupo, NotanMBA Press 2009), and has a third book (The Fifth Age of Work: Redesigning Work for a MobileSocial World, Night Owls Press), coming out Fall 2013. He has been involved in coworking since 2007, as a coworking space owner, partner, academic researcher, and consultant. He is a partner at Conjunctured Coworking.
Drew Jones
Follow me
Latest posts by Drew Jones (see all)

By Drew Jones On Thursday of last week I was fortunate enough to participate in a panel discussion about the future of work and corporate coworking at Workspring in Chicago. Using my new book, The Fifth Age of Work, as a jumping off point, we had a panel of some really amazing folks threading together questions from the audience. John […]

Source: DJ Daily Drip

‘Leading the Generations’ & More…

Follow me
Head of Consulting at Conjunctured
Drew Jones, Ph.D is an organizational consultant, educator, and writer. He is a Lecturer of Management, Organizational Behavior, and Corporate Social Responsibility in the McCoy College of Business Administration at Texas State University, in San Marcos, TX. He has consulted with firms in the software, food and beverage, construction, advertising, sports management, coworking, and for profit education industries. He has published two books (The Innovation Acid Test: Growth Through Design and Differentiation, Triarchy Press 2008), including the first book about the coworking movement (I’m Outta: How coworking is making the office obsolete, with Todd Sundsted and Tony Bacigalupo, NotanMBA Press 2009), and has a third book (The Fifth Age of Work: Redesigning Work for a MobileSocial World, Night Owls Press), coming out Fall 2013. He has been involved in coworking since 2007, as a coworking space owner, partner, academic researcher, and consultant. He is a partner at Conjunctured Coworking.
Drew Jones
Follow me
Latest posts by Drew Jones (see all)

By Drew Jones Thanks go out to Texas CEO Magazine for running my article, “Leading the Generations,” in their Jan/Feb. issue. Also, Sharon Shinn of BizEd Magazine wrote an insightful review of The Fifth Age of Work in the Bookshelf section of their current issue. I appreciate that as well. Finally, thanks to David Coleman at CMSWire for […]

Source: DJ Daily Drip

The Leadership Self

Follow me
Head of Consulting at Conjunctured
Drew Jones, Ph.D is an organizational consultant, educator, and writer. He is a Lecturer of Management, Organizational Behavior, and Corporate Social Responsibility in the McCoy College of Business Administration at Texas State University, in San Marcos, TX. He has consulted with firms in the software, food and beverage, construction, advertising, sports management, coworking, and for profit education industries. He has published two books (The Innovation Acid Test: Growth Through Design and Differentiation, Triarchy Press 2008), including the first book about the coworking movement (I’m Outta: How coworking is making the office obsolete, with Todd Sundsted and Tony Bacigalupo, NotanMBA Press 2009), and has a third book (The Fifth Age of Work: Redesigning Work for a MobileSocial World, Night Owls Press), coming out Fall 2013. He has been involved in coworking since 2007, as a coworking space owner, partner, academic researcher, and consultant. He is a partner at Conjunctured Coworking.
Drew Jones
Follow me
Latest posts by Drew Jones (see all)

By Drew Jones In his book, Modernity and Self Identity, Anthony Giddens explores the various ways that individuals maintain a cohesive sense of self in a post-modern world. The collapse/disappearance of traditional cultural systems all around us creates uncertainty and anxiety, within which we have fewer and fewer reliable islands where we can call home. He talks about […]

Source: DJ Daily Drip

What Would You Say You Do Here?

Follow me
Head of Consulting at Conjunctured
Drew Jones, Ph.D is an organizational consultant, educator, and writer. He is a Lecturer of Management, Organizational Behavior, and Corporate Social Responsibility in the McCoy College of Business Administration at Texas State University, in San Marcos, TX. He has consulted with firms in the software, food and beverage, construction, advertising, sports management, coworking, and for profit education industries. He has published two books (The Innovation Acid Test: Growth Through Design and Differentiation, Triarchy Press 2008), including the first book about the coworking movement (I’m Outta: How coworking is making the office obsolete, with Todd Sundsted and Tony Bacigalupo, NotanMBA Press 2009), and has a third book (The Fifth Age of Work: Redesigning Work for a MobileSocial World, Night Owls Press), coming out Fall 2013. He has been involved in coworking since 2007, as a coworking space owner, partner, academic researcher, and consultant. He is a partner at Conjunctured Coworking.
Drew Jones
Follow me
Latest posts by Drew Jones (see all)

By Drew Jones Over the past decade, Roger Martin has written prolifically about how the principles and methods of design thinking(DT) are transforming the way some companies are being managed. Key among the insights from DT is the simple yet challenging observation that in today’s high-performance firms, top talent is almost always engaged in tangible […]

Source: DJ Daily Drip

It Starts with Strategy

Follow me
Head of Consulting at Conjunctured
Drew Jones, Ph.D is an organizational consultant, educator, and writer. He is a Lecturer of Management, Organizational Behavior, and Corporate Social Responsibility in the McCoy College of Business Administration at Texas State University, in San Marcos, TX. He has consulted with firms in the software, food and beverage, construction, advertising, sports management, coworking, and for profit education industries. He has published two books (The Innovation Acid Test: Growth Through Design and Differentiation, Triarchy Press 2008), including the first book about the coworking movement (I’m Outta: How coworking is making the office obsolete, with Todd Sundsted and Tony Bacigalupo, NotanMBA Press 2009), and has a third book (The Fifth Age of Work: Redesigning Work for a MobileSocial World, Night Owls Press), coming out Fall 2013. He has been involved in coworking since 2007, as a coworking space owner, partner, academic researcher, and consultant. He is a partner at Conjunctured Coworking.
Drew Jones
Follow me
Latest posts by Drew Jones (see all)

By Drew Jones In conversations with fellow organizational consultants, I often hear that their engagements with their clients are, primarily, supportive in nature. That is, they are there to help that company achieve its strategic goals, whatever those might be. Sounds straightforward enough, right? Well, perhaps not. First, many firms (the clients) can be rather confused about what […]

Source: DJ Daily Drip

So Much for Science and Rationality

Follow me
Head of Consulting at Conjunctured
Drew Jones, Ph.D is an organizational consultant, educator, and writer. He is a Lecturer of Management, Organizational Behavior, and Corporate Social Responsibility in the McCoy College of Business Administration at Texas State University, in San Marcos, TX. He has consulted with firms in the software, food and beverage, construction, advertising, sports management, coworking, and for profit education industries. He has published two books (The Innovation Acid Test: Growth Through Design and Differentiation, Triarchy Press 2008), including the first book about the coworking movement (I’m Outta: How coworking is making the office obsolete, with Todd Sundsted and Tony Bacigalupo, NotanMBA Press 2009), and has a third book (The Fifth Age of Work: Redesigning Work for a MobileSocial World, Night Owls Press), coming out Fall 2013. He has been involved in coworking since 2007, as a coworking space owner, partner, academic researcher, and consultant. He is a partner at Conjunctured Coworking.
Drew Jones
Follow me
Latest posts by Drew Jones (see all)

On the opening day (11/7/13) of its IPO, Twitter shares (TWTR) traded up from its offer price of $26/share to $45/share.  By contrast, Facebook (FB) opened (5/12/13) at $42/share and promptly began to train downward for many months.  Facebook has since then been trading up for several months ($47 today), which is indeed good to see.  However, the contrasting stories of the initial IPOs paint an interesting picture.

Twitter is yet to post a profit, and reports around $650 million a year in revenue.  Facebook, by contrast, reports almost $2B a quarter in revenue, and has been profitable for three straight years.  So, if one were to base share price and company potential on numbers and data, Twitter is a fraction of the company that Facebook is.  But so much for science and rationality.

It boils down to investor mood, sentient, and emotion.  Investors were skeptical and still on the sidelines at the time that Facebook went public.  This week, when Twitter went public, investor mood is all champagne and bubbly.  Markets have been up for weeks, the Dow reaching record highs almost daily.  But this does not mean that Twitter has greater potential as a company going forward.

Such is the nature of much decision making in the corporate world. For all of the bluster and infographics about the importance of data and big data, humans are still primarily an emotional species.  We aspire for rationality, but we have to learn it and fake it.  Our default setting, for better or worse, is emotion. Recognizing such a simple thing would save us a lot of time and angst.

Source: Drew Jones Daily Drip

The Lonely Frontier

Follow me
Head of Consulting at Conjunctured
Drew Jones, Ph.D is an organizational consultant, educator, and writer. He is a Lecturer of Management, Organizational Behavior, and Corporate Social Responsibility in the McCoy College of Business Administration at Texas State University, in San Marcos, TX. He has consulted with firms in the software, food and beverage, construction, advertising, sports management, coworking, and for profit education industries. He has published two books (The Innovation Acid Test: Growth Through Design and Differentiation, Triarchy Press 2008), including the first book about the coworking movement (I’m Outta: How coworking is making the office obsolete, with Todd Sundsted and Tony Bacigalupo, NotanMBA Press 2009), and has a third book (The Fifth Age of Work: Redesigning Work for a MobileSocial World, Night Owls Press), coming out Fall 2013. He has been involved in coworking since 2007, as a coworking space owner, partner, academic researcher, and consultant. He is a partner at Conjunctured Coworking.
Drew Jones
Follow me
Latest posts by Drew Jones (see all)

It is cliche to say, but change is never easy.  The kinds of organizational changes I am advocating in my new book- The Fifth Age of Work– are far from easy.  The comfort of familiarity and tradition should never be underestimated.  Established tradition and known routines make the world easier to understand and navigate.  Yet, established traditions and known routines also bring us some of the most stultifying and inhumane cultural practices in the world- subjugation of women (“well, that’s just our tradition”), slavery, the caste system, etc.

Moving forward into unknown futures and frontiers is always scary.  Just imagine what it felt like for early American pioneers when they left their families in Europe and moved out to the prairies of Nebraska. Willa Cather’s world was stark, beautiful, and lonely.  Frontiers always are.  The world of work and organizations that is emerging is also frightening.  Asking established professionals to significantly change their worlds is challenging, to say the least.

“Hey, I know you  used to have a huge office with a big oak desk and two personal assistants, but now we’ve taken that away and you need to work in the cafe with all of the other folks!”

Naturally, few people will want to do this.  However, we are at the cusp of a new frontier, and the comfort of tradition is no longer a good enough excuse for not embarking on the journey and crossing into the unknown.  It’s what I call the difference between slingshots, which propel in one direction into the future, and boomerangs, which go out a bit and then return to where you started.  No question, people do get hurt by rocks flung by slingshots.  But tradition for the sake of tradition, I contend, hurts many more people.

 

Source: Drew Jones Daily Drip

Y Leadership

Follow me
Head of Consulting at Conjunctured
Drew Jones, Ph.D is an organizational consultant, educator, and writer. He is a Lecturer of Management, Organizational Behavior, and Corporate Social Responsibility in the McCoy College of Business Administration at Texas State University, in San Marcos, TX. He has consulted with firms in the software, food and beverage, construction, advertising, sports management, coworking, and for profit education industries. He has published two books (The Innovation Acid Test: Growth Through Design and Differentiation, Triarchy Press 2008), including the first book about the coworking movement (I’m Outta: How coworking is making the office obsolete, with Todd Sundsted and Tony Bacigalupo, NotanMBA Press 2009), and has a third book (The Fifth Age of Work: Redesigning Work for a MobileSocial World, Night Owls Press), coming out Fall 2013. He has been involved in coworking since 2007, as a coworking space owner, partner, academic researcher, and consultant. He is a partner at Conjunctured Coworking.
Drew Jones
Follow me
Latest posts by Drew Jones (see all)

This fall my new book, The Fifth Age of Work, will be published by Night Owls Press.  The book tracks the parallel evolution of the independent, freelancer economy, on the one hand, and the rapid transformation of mainstream firms, on the other.  At the heart of the book is the idea that, in the relatively near future, Gen Y knowledge workers will no longer be content to work in Baby Boomer-age organizations that insist on traditional forms of structure, design, and management.  Rather, top talent in the near future will demand:

  • Maximum choice and flexibility
  • Involvement in meaningful work
  • Smart and challenging colleagues
  • Opportunities to innovate and grow
  • Authentic and believable leadership

We know this because it is already happening.  Traditionalist managers who doubt this will only be able to operate with their head in the sand for so long!

Theory Y

But how does a firm go about planning for and leading Gen Y talent?  The answer, ironically, was provided some 50 years ago.  Douglas McGregor’s book, The Human Side of Enterprise, outlined a fundamental difference in how managers view people and their potential.  One the one hand was Theory X, which suggested that people are inherently lazy, shiftless, don’t like to work, and need to be managed with punishments and rewards and carrots and sticks.  On the other hand was Theory Y, which suggested that, left to their own devices, people naturally like to work, and that if you give them trust and a long-leash, they will generate the outcomes that a company desires.

It is not much of an exaggeration to say that, despite all of the rhetoric about decentralization and the flattening organization, most companies today remain locked within a Theory X managerial approach.  Lip service is often paid to flexibility and choice, but in practice such words evaporate into fear and control.  As I suggest above, though, Theory X management will be a non-starter in the near future.

But what comes next?

Y Leadership

Gen Y will demand a fundamentally new and generationally relevant leadership approach.  Respected and effective leaders in the near future won’t be tall, dark, and handsome white men who went to the top business schools.  Rather, they will be technologists, engineers, and designers who are technical experts, people who gain respect from peers because of their chops and their humility.  Leadership will be a team activity, where the alpha male model of yesterday will seem more and more abusive and out of place in a networked, collaborative economy.  As IBM’s Ginni Rometty says recently, “success will be measured not by what you know, but by what you share.”  One-way commands of yesterday’s organization are giving way to more of a Starfish model of leadership, where different people have influence in different situations depending on content and context.

sociocracy

Of course, in practice it is never quite so simple.  However, the general movement towards ‘Y’ principles is undeniable.

Gen Y x Theory Y = Y Leadership

Among other things, this will likely mean that fewer of tomorrow’s leaders will be MBAs.  Rather, they will be engineers, designers, scientists, athletes, artists, and social scientists who figure out how to make something they are passionate about INTO a business.  Companies like GE are already doing this, from the inside-out.  Yesterday’s standard B-school model of leadership, bequeathed to us originally by Dale Carnegie himself, will eventually seem like a quaint relic from the 1950s.  “How to win friends and influence people” (Theory X) will be replaced by “How to create value collaboratively to enhance user experiences” (Theory Y).

 

 

Recap: Two Years of Austin Coworking – Anniversary Party

It was definitely great to see some old friends as well as getting to meet some remarkable new folks too at our Two Year Anniversary Party on August 21 (205 RSVP’s!). It always AMAZES us the exceptionally genuine people we’ve been privileged to meet over time through the Conjunctured community of friends and supporters. So, thanks for the amazement! Also, with your help, we were even able to raise some money for an East Austin classroom.

A word about our kickass sponsors…

We’d love for all our parties to be as great as this one, but can’t do it without generous sponsors. Please let our food and drink sponsors know you appreciated their goodness by interacting with them on Twitter & Facebook:

Tito’s Handmade Vodka@titosvodka, fb fanpage

East End Wines@eastendwines, fb fanpage

KIND Snack Bars@kindsnacks, fb fanpage

Sweet Leaf Tea@sweetleaf, fb fanpage

The Green Cart@thegreencart, fb fanpage

In case you missed the party, or simply to refresh your mind, here’s some highlights from the night:

Video time lapse

– can you spot who spends the most time at the bar? 😉

Credit: Conjunctured Two Year Anniversary Party from Nick Simonite on Vimeo.

Live Art throughout the night

There was a team of artists set up in the back doing randomly inspired pieces of artwork. Each were improvisational, and some even were based on a MadLibs-esque suggestion system. Special thanks to Zach Taylor for organizing the artists and helping to create some unique visuals

Good eating

Special thanks to Green Cart, West End Bistro, and KIND Snack Bars.

food

food

food

Good drinking

Special thanks to Tito’s Vodka, East End Wines, Sweet Leaf Tea & of course Mando and Sharlee (bartenders extraordinare!)

drinks

Music by Andrei Matei

austin dj

dancing

Chatting it up in the back

We turned our back parking lot into extra space for the party. Some christmas lights go a long way! This was the first time we’ve opened up the back for a party, and it turned out great! We had the music from inside piped to the back too.





Chatting it up in the front

A number of us were hanging out on the picnic tables or on the front porch enjoying the nice cool breeze.

Chatting it up inside

Nothing beats a lil a/c and good people



More Photos:

Flickr Photos:

www.flickr.com

conjunctured's Conjunctured's 2 Year Anniversary Party photoset conjunctured’s Conjunctured’s 2 Year Anniversary Party photoset

Conjunctured Party Facebook Photo Album – Feel free to tag yourself!

Conjunctured Party photos on TwitC – The founder of TwitC stopped by and took a bunch of photos too. Check ‘em out!

Drawings by Honoria Starbuck – did you get drawn and eavesdropped on by our live sketch artist guest? Take a look and see!